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By Nick Georgandis

As the Australian Open dawns down under, here are a few facts and figures to take note of:

2005: The last time a man other than Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer, or Novak Djokovic won the men's singles title.

1971-1973: The last time a man (Ken Rosewall) won three straight Australian Open titles. Novak Djokovic has a chance to do the same this year.

2003: The last time before 2012 that four different men each won a major in the same year.

1934: The last time a British man (Fred Perry) won the Australian Open. Andy Murray, the defending US Open and Olympic champion, will seek to snap that 80-year slump.

7: Number of cities that have hosted the Australian Open - Christchurch and Hastings in New Zealand, and Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide, Sydney and Melbourne in Australia.

4: Most titles in the Open Era by a male player at the Australian Open, held jointly by Andre Agassi and Roger Federer.

5: Most titles in the Open Era by a female player at the Australian Open, held by Serena Williams.

29-2: The record of No. 1 seed Novak Djokvoic at the Australian Open since 2008 - he's won it three times.

37: The number of years since a native Australian won the men's singles title. Mark Edmondson took the crown in 1976, ending a period in which Aussies had won six of the first eight titles at the tournament to start the Open Era.

35: Number of years since a native Australian won the women's singles title. Chris O'Neil took the crown in 1978, the end of a golden era that saw Aussie women take 10 titles in 11 years.

10: Years since an American man won the Australian Open title, with Andre Agassi accomplishing that feat in 2003. This is the second-longest dry spell down under for American men since the Open Era began, exceeded only by the 12-year span between the titles of Brian Teacher in 1980 and Jim Courier in 1992.

30-16: Career record of former Australian No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt at the Australian Open. The best Aussie player of the last 20 years, Hewitt's best shot at a home turf Slam came in 2005 when he fell to Marat Safin in the finals in four sets.

.652: Lleyton Hewitt's career singles winning percentage at the Australian Open, perhaps owing to the pressure involved with trying to win a title for the home folks, it is far below his career winning percentage for all matches of .722.

14-10: Career record of Australian Samantha Stosur at the Australian Open. Stosur, who has finished each of the past three seasons in the Top 10, has never advanced past the fourth round at her home Slam, and is 0-4 against Top 10 opponents.

2: In the last 10 years, only three women have repeated a Grand Slam title from one year to the next, something No. 1 seed Victoria Azarenka will try to accomplish. The three are Justine Henin (French Open, 2005-2007); Serena Williams (Australian Open 2009-2010 and Wimbledon 2009-2010) and Kim Clijsters (US Open 2009-2010).

3: Serena Williams will try to become the first woman to win three straight Grand Slam titles since she won four straight from the 2002 French Open to the 2003 Australian Open. The last woman other than to Williams to hold the Wimbledon, US Open and Australian Open titles concurrently was Martina HIngis in 1997-1998.

The last time a man other than Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer or Novak Djokovic won the men's singles title.

1971-1973: The last time a man (Ken Rosewall) won three straight Australian Open titles. Novak Djokovic has a chance to do the same this year.

2003: The last time before 2012 that four different men each won a major in the same year.

1934: The last time a British man (Fred Perry) won the Australian Open. Andy Murray, the defending US Open and Olympic champion, will seek to snap that 80-year slump.

7: Number of cities that have hosted the Australian Open - Christchurch and Hastings in New Zealand, and Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide, Sydney and Melbourne in Australia.

4: Most titles in the Open Era by a male player at the Australian Open, held jointly by Andre Agassi and Roger Federer.

5: Most titles in the Open Era by a female player at the Australian Open, held by Serena Williams.

29-2: The record of No. 1 seed Novak Djokvoic at the Australian Open since 2008 - he's won it three times.

37: The number of years since a native Australian won the men's singles title. Mark Edmondson took the crown in 1976, ending a period in which Aussies had won six of the first eight titles at the tournament to start the Open Era.

35: Number of years since a native Australian won the women's singles title. Chris O'Neil took the crown in 1978, the end of a golden era that saw Aussie women take 10 titles in 11 years.

10: Years since an American man won the Australian Open title, with Andre Agassi accomplishing that feat in 2003. This is the second-longest dry spell down under for American men since the Open Era began, exceeded only by the 12-year span between the titles of Brian Teacher in 1980 and Jim Courier in 1992.

30-16: Career record of former Australian No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt at the Australian Open. The best Aussie player of the last 20 years, Hewitt's best shot at a home turf Slam came in 2005 when he fell to Marat Safin in the finals in four sets.

.652: Lleyton Hewitt's career singles winning percentage at the Australian Open, perhaps owing to the pressure involved with trying to win a title for the home folks, it is far below his career winning percentage for all matches of .722.

14-10: Career record of Australian Samantha Stosur at the Australian Open. Stosur, who has finished each of the past three seasons in the Top 10, has never advanced past the fourth round at her home Slam, and is 0-4 against Top 10 opponents.

2: In the last 10 years, only three women have repeated a Grand Slam title from one year to the next, something No. 1 seed Victoria Azarenka will try to accomplish. The three are Justine Henin (French Open, 2005-2007); Serena Williams (Australian Open 2009-2010 and Wimbledon 2009-2010) and Kim Clijsters (US Open 2009-2010).

3: Serena Williams will try to become the first woman to win three straight Grand Slam titles since she won four straight from the 2002 French Open to the 2003 Australian Open. The last woman other than to Williams to hold the Wimbledon, US Open and Australian Open titles concurrently was Martina HIngis in 1997-1998.

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