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By Tennis Now | Sunday, September 16, 2018

 
Su-Wei Hsieh

Su-Wei Hsieh raised her record in finals to 3-0 capturing the Hiroshima title.

Photo credit: Akira Ando/hana-cupid Japan Women's Open Tennis

Hobbled by an ankle injury last year, Su-Wei Hsieh continues to soar this season.

The 32-year-old Hsieh carved up Amanda Anisimova, 6-2, 6-2, to capture her third career title in Hiroshima.

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It was Hsieh's first singles title in six years. She ruled Kuala Lumpur and Guangzhou in 2012. 

A resurgent Hsieh, who toppled world No. 1 Simona Halep en route to the Wimbledon round of 16 in July, played shrewd all-court tennis in a composed 58-minute performance.

Backing the American up with a deep return, Hsieh drew a netted backhand breaking for a 2-1 lead. Patiently moving Anismova side-to-side, Hsieh opened the court with a short-angled forehand and finished it battering a backhand crosscourt to break again for 4-1.

The victory will vault Hsieh back into the Top 30 for the first time since February, 2013. 



A devoted spin doctor who possesses some of the softest hands on the circuit, Hsieh said a return to full health this season and a commitment to having fun on court have been keys to her resurgence.

"I twisted my ankle, then I had a problem with my ankle, it was very bad and I could not even walk on the ground," Hsieh told WTA Tennis.com afterward. "Last year in the clay court season, every match I played, it was kind of like a torture."

Renewed confidence in her movement means Hsieh is getting to more balls and has a bit more time to set up and showcase her magic touch.

"Maybe because I did not put too much pressure this year," Hsieh said. "I was more enjoying it trying to run [down] every ball, trying to do this and that and lob, trying to run and hit a big one and sometimes I made it. I was enjoying doing all the shots and playing without pressure."

 

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